Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil Hair

Detection of cannabinoids in hair after cosmetic application of hemp oil Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, Using hemp oil for hair has many benefits, including nourishing your scalp and preventing breakage. Here's how to integrate it into your routine. Hemp seed oilprotects your hair from damage and dryness and reduces scalp inflammation. Here are the potential benefits of hemp seed oil for your hair.

Detection of cannabinoids in hair after cosmetic application of hemp oil

Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Associated Data

All data generated or analyzed during this study are included in this published article.

Abstract

The detection of cannabis constituents and metabolites in hair is an established procedure to provide evidence of exposure to cannabis. We present the first known evidence to suggest that applying hemp oil to hair, as cosmetic treatment, may result in the incorporation of Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD) and in one instance, the metabolite 11-hydroxy-Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH). 10 volunteers treated their head hair daily with commercially available hemp oil for a period of 6 weeks. Head hair samples were collected before and after the application period. Hair samples were washed with methanol and subjected to clean up via liquid/liquid and solid phase extraction procedures, and then GC-MS/MS for the analysis of THC, CBN, CBD, THC-OH and THC-COOH. Application of hemp oil to hair resulted in the incorporation of one or more cannabis constituents in 89% of volunteers, and 33% of the group tested positive for the three major constituents, THC, CBN and CBD. One volunteer showed low levels of the metabolite THC-OH. We suggest that cosmetic use of hemp oil should be recorded when sampling head hair for analysis, and that the interpretative value of cannabinoid hair measurements from people reporting application of hemp oil is treated with caution in both criminology and public health.

Introduction

Cannabis Sativa is a plant species of Cannabis. In addition to its recreational use as a drug of abuse, the plant has widespread alternative uses including the production of food, cosmetics (hemp), textiles and medicinal applications 1 . When toxicology laboratories are required to investigate past exposure to cannabis, analysis of hair can provide powerful evidence. The compounds usually targeted for hair analysis to identify cannabis exposure are: Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active compound of cannabis, the metabolite [11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH)] and two cannabinoids (cannabinol (CBN) and cannabidiol (CBD)) 2 . Typically passage of these cannabinoids into the hair includes passive diffusion from blood, diffusion from sweat/sebum or external contamination. One of the key questions to be addressed when interpreting the results of cannabinoid hair analysis is that of proof of consumption. Are the results sufficiently clear to suggest cannabis was consumed, or could the results actually be the result of passive exposure to cannabis smoke, or other mechanisms? Passive exposure is defined by an individual being in an environment that is exposed to drugs, an important public health problem. Cannabis smoke can be inhaled or absorbed into the hair by persons other than the intended smoker/user 3 . Researchers have evaluated second-hand cannabis smoke exposure and the corresponding levels of cannabinoids in biological samples 3 , 4 . Herrmann et al. discovered that in unventilated, confined conditions cannabinoid detection was above threshold and higher concentrations of THC and THC-COOH were found predominantly in the blood, urine and hair 4 . THC and THC-COOH have lower incorporation rates in hair in comparison to other bodily matrices. The low presence of THC may be explained by its weak affinity to melanin while the acidic nature of hair may be the reason for the absence of THC-COOH 5 . Along with the levels of cannabis constituents detected in passive exposure, analysis has been conducted to understand what physiological impact exposure has 3 . Past research has shown evidence of increased heart rate and minor impairments in coordination and memory 4 , 6 , 7 . Identification of THC/CBN/CBD in hair suggests exposure to cannabis, which could be due to low level or infrequent use of cannabis or historic or passive exposure. However, some argue that the presence of cannabinoids in hair, especially THC is indicative of repeated or chronic exposure 5 , 8 . The distinction between external contamination and consumption can be difficult for cannabinoid hair analysis 9 , and the implication of a positive test result can have significant consequences for the individual involved. THC-COOH is only formed inside the body, and the presence of this gives unequivocal proof of consumption when detected in hair samples. The metabolite has never been discovered in cannabis smoke ruling out environmental contamination 10 . With hair analysis, THC-COOH is detectable at very low concentrations. The drawbacks for detection from this biological matrix are the requirement for expensive instrumentation and sample preparation can be a more time-consuming process when compared to urine 11 . Routine laboratory screening of hair for cannabis varies and includes the detection of cannabinoids and/or THC-COOH 8 . Hemp is a variety of Cannabis Sativa and is closely related to Cannabis with the difference being in the percentage of THC 12 . Hemp is grown for industrial use and found in food, lotions, medicines, clothing and construction materials. Hemp oil is extracted by pressing the seeds from the female hemp plant 13 . The legalisation of hemp has caused controversy. This is because research has shown that the use or consumption of hemp products could have the potential to impact on drug testing for cannabis 14 .

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Hemp oil products are advertised in health shops for their good source of omega fatty acids 15 . Bosy et al. 16 assessed whether oral consumption of hemp oil would negatively affect existing drug screening protocols. Various oils were screened (THC content of bottled oils was 36.0, 117.5, 36.4, 45.7, 21.0, 11.5 mg/g) and administered to volunteers and their urine measured for metabolite levels. GC-MS analysis determined the amount of THC-COOH in each participant’s urine to be below the confirmation cut-off within a 48 hour cessation period. Similarly to hemp oil, hemp foods are classified as ‘natural foods’ and are commercially available. Leson et al. showed that daily consumption of hemp food can lead to the presence of THC and THC-COOH in urine, but these compounds were below the confirmation thresholds 17 . These authors 16 , 17 suggest that hemp food and oil products do contain cannabinoids but in very low concentrations, and that ingestion of such products should not be deemed as a concern in drug testing. The Cannabis plant has been used in the production of cosmetics through the use of hemp oil and cannabis extracts 18 . An evaluation of Cannabio® shampoo revealed levels of THC, CBD and CBN, three constituents that indicate cannabis exposure 19 . However, normal hygiene practice using the cosmetic produced no positive results in hair. Extreme use could generate positive results for CBN and CBD but not the primary constituent, THC.

Hemp oil is marketed as an effective cosmetic treatment for hair, with claims that direct application of the oil to hair has moisturizing benefits, can aid hair growth, may protect the hair and aid in damage repair, and the oil may add shine to the hair. These claims are unsubstantiated but there is a substantial number of online retailers selling various hemp oil based products intended for direct application to head hair. The composition of these products range from pure hemp oil, to hemp oil included at a relatively low concentration into shampoos and other hair treatments.

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In this paper we investigate direct hemp oil application to head hair and the implications on resulting cannabinoid measurements.

Results

Cannabinoid concentrations pre and post hemp oil application

Head hair samples were collected from volunteers as described in Methods, and analysed before and after the six week period of hemp oil administration. Results are displayed in Table 1 .

What Pros Have to Say About Using Hemp Oil for Hair

L ong before CBD was the cannabinoid star of the beauty aisle, hemp seed oil reigned supreme. The OG plant-derived ingredient—which has always been legal—might not have the same name recognition as its buzzier cousin, but it does have plenty of benefits worth being aware of. One worth diving into? Hemp oil for hair.

But before we get into the wonders of coating your strands with hemp seed oil, let’s make sure we’re all on the same page about what’s what in the world of cannabis derivatives. Certain ingredients—namely hemp oil and hemp seed oil—may sound the same, but ultimately, these ingredients do different things for your hair and skin, so it’s important to understand what you’re spending your money on. Allow us (and the pros!) to break it down for you, so you know exactly what’s worth buying. and why.

The difference between hemp seed oil and hemp oil

First things first: you need to understand the terminology, because hemp oil and hemp seed oil are two completely different things. They both come from the cannabis plant, but hemp is derived from the leaves and the stalk. Meanwhile, hemp seed oil is derived from—you guessed it!—the seeds, and is cold-pressed the same way other carrier oils like jojoba and sunflower seed. The biggest difference between the two is that hemp oil is chock full of cannabanoids, like THC, CBN, and CBD, while hemp seed oil doesn’t have any of these.

Hemp seed oil, however, does have antioxidants, as well as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which have made it a skin-care staple for decades. It’s known for its moisturizing and non-comedogenic properties, and considering that your scalp is skin, too, that means potentially great things for your hair as well.

“Hemp oil contains anti-irritant, anti-inflammatory topical properties, it’s rich in amino acids, vitamins and antioxidants which provide nourishing and soothing benefits for the scalp,” says Fabian Lliguin, co-founder and president of Rahua Beauty. He notes that in the same way that all skin types can benefit from using hemp seed oil, all hair types potentially can, too.

The potential benefits of using hempseed and hemp oil for hair

While there isn’t any declarative scientific evidence to support the specific benefits of hemp seed oil or hemp oil for hair, pros say there are still some reasons it could be worth integrating a few drops into your hair-care routine. “Hemp oil provides nourishment and hydration, because it has one of the highest concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids of all naturally occurring oils,” says Jennifer Weiderman, the CMO of Hempz. “It is non-greasy and provides an optimal balance for moisture retention.” There have also been murmurs on the Internet that hemp seed oil can help with hair growth and strengthening strands, thanks to the fact that it’s packed with proteins, but there has yet to be any research to back this up.

What we do know, however, is that hemp-derived oils are natural oils, and that other natural oils like coconut, mineral, and sunflower have been tapped all over the world used as hair treatments for centuries and have well-documented benefits. A 2015 study from the International Journal of Trichology found that oils play an “important role in protecting hair from damage,” and that “applying oil on a regular basis can enhance lubrication of the shaft and help prevent hair breakage.” While hemp seed and hemp oil for hair in particular haven’t been studied, it’s not a huge leap to say that they could potentially have some of the same benefits.

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How to use hempseed and hemp oil for hair

If you want to integrate any sort hemp seed oil or hemp oil for hair into your routine, pros suggest doing it by way of a shampoo, conditioner, or treatment that combines it with other nourishing ingredients. Shop our picks, below.

Rahua Founder’s Blend Scalp & Hair Treatment, $40

This treatment mixes hemp oil with palo santo, sunflower, and rahua Oils, plus shea butter and quinoa. “These star ingredients strengthen the user’s follicles, balance the scalp’s moisture levels, act as an anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant, as well as nourish and sooth the scalp,” says Lliguin.

Love Beauty and Planet Hemp Seed Shampoo and Conditioner, $7 each

Photo: Love Beauty + Planet

Yup—you can get your hemp oil for hair fix at the drugstore. Love Beauty and Planet’s sulfate-free shower products use hemp seed oil and nana leaf to cleanse your scalp while nourishing your skin and strands. Users have raved about how gentle it is, and love it for its cooling sensation.

Briogeo B.Well 100mg CBD + Arnica Flower Soothing Skin & Scalp Oil, $48

Want to use hemp and hemp seed oil together? Try this treatment. It combines CBD (aka hemp) with its close cousin hempseed oil, plus arnica flower and tamanu oil, to calm your scalp before you even step out of the shower.

Hempz Herbal Healthy Hair Fortifying Shampoo and Conditioner, $18

Formulated for the sake of strengthening hair, these products use hemp oil alongside pomegranate and sunflower seed oil keep strands healthy and well-fortified.

Here’s what happened when our beauty editor tried CBD shampoo and conditioner for herself. Plus, why argan oil is another natural ingredient worth adding into your haircare routine. especially if you want to grow your stands, STAT.

Our editors independently select these products. Making a purchase through our links may earn Well+Good a commission.

Hemp Seed Oil For Hair – 4 Benefits And How To Use It

Improving hair health, reducing breakage, and more ways this oil keeps your locks happy!

Tiffany Young is the CEO and founder of ThinHairThick. She is also a recognized expert in the hair and beauty industry with celebrity clientele. Her own personal struggles with hair loss created an opportunity for her to deep-dive into lear. more

Arshiya Syeda is an editor at StyleCraze. Prior to that, she was a content writer and combined her writing and research skills to write over 200 high-performing articles on hairstyles, hair care, and . more

Hemp seed oil can do great things for your hair. It is extracted from hemp seeds and has a clear green color. Cannabis sativa (hemp) plant has a relaxing effect. Using hemp seed oil for hair has become a popular practice in recent years. Whether it is dry hair, rough hair, damaged hair, or scalp inflammation – hemp seed oil can help nourish and soothe your strands and the scalp. Hemp vitamins, proteins, and essential fatty acids make your hair healthy and lustrous. Read on to learn all the benefits of hemp seed oil for hair and how to use it. Scroll down!

In This Article

Benefits Of Using Hemp Seed Oil For Hair

There is much anecdotal evidence for the benefits of hemp seed oil. It is said to possess antibacterial properties, treat scalp infections, stimulate hair growth, moisturize the scalp, and prevent breakage. Read on to know more about these benefits in detail.