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How many marijuana seeds per plant

How Many Cannabis Seeds Per Pot?

If you have ever wondered how many cannabis seeds per pot, look no further. One seed is all it takes to grow one plant so even if you see plants that look like as if they were bushes it is all just one seed. Regardless of the apparent size of the plant, all growers know that only one cannabis seeds per pot is required.

So you know how many cannabis seeds per pot, but you want to know what will happen anyway?

If you use more than one or many cannabis seeds in a pot, the cannabis plants will begin to compete against each other for nutrients, so the smallest cannabis plants (which sometimes may be the best phenotypes.) will get wiped out by the bigger cannabis plants.

If you are growing from regular cannabis seeds they could also cross-pollinate resulting in buds with cannabis seeds in them. It sounds simple enough but if the buds have seeds inside them, the potency of the strain can be reduced up to 30%. Each cannabis seed is a plant and they need their own space to grow and thrive, as well as to produce bigger and better buds. Remember that more than one cannabis seed per pot is too many.

You might find our FAQ Submission How Many Marijuana Seeds To Grow A Plant? useful!

How to Grow Marijuana from Seed

If you’re in a location where cannabis (another term for marijuana; short for the plant cannabis sativa) is illegal, growing it is probably illegal too. Bringing in seeds or cuttings to your location can very well be a felony, and reputable sellers won’t ship to you.

You can probably purchase and grow hemp seeds and plants, which have a negligible amount of THC, but these plants won’t produce the psychoactive effects of plants that contain higher levels of THC. Check with your seller to be certain you’re getting what you think you’re purchasing. If you buy seeds for CBD-only hemp plants by mistake, you can end up being very disappointed post-harvest.

How to acquire seeds or cuttings

You can usually find cannabis seeds for sale at most dispensaries in areas where growing cannabis for personal use is legal. You may also find growers who sell cuttings/clones. You can expect to pay $50 to $100 for a pack of ten seeds. When shopping for seeds or cuttings, read the labels and any other information the manufacturer provides on its website or in its catalog to make sure you’re getting the right seeds or cuttings (the strain) for the plants you want to grow.

One way to get your mitts on some seeds is to collect seeds when you find them in flowers you purchased, or get some from friends if they’re collecting.

  • Feminized seeds: Nearly all seeds sold by reputable companies are feminized, but make sure they are. These seeds are specially treated to grow into female plants.
  • Auto-flowering or photoperiod: Auto-flowering plants are easier, because they enter the flower stage after a certain number of weeks regardless of the light/dark cycle. If you’re a beginner, seriously consider going with auto-flowering plants.
  • Genetic background: If seeds are from a well-established strain, such as O.G. Kush, Bubble Gum, or a cross-breed, the genetic background should be stated.
  • Blend: The blend represents the percentage of the three species — sativa, indica, and ruderalis. All auto-flower strains contain some percentage of ruderalis, which is responsible for the auto-flowering nature of the plant.
  • Yield indoors: The number of grams of bud per square meter of plant when grown indoors.
  • Yield outdoors: The number of grams of bud per plant (after drying) when grown outdoors.
  • Plant height indoors: Shorter than when grown outdoors.
  • Plant height outdoors: Taller than when grown indoors.
  • Time to harvest: Approximate number of weeks after germination the flower should be ready to harvest.
  • Potency: Percentages of CBD and THC.
  • Effect: The type of experience you can expect when consuming product from the plant.
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Know the laws about buying cannabis

  • In some European countries, laws prohibit growing cannabis, but seed is legal, which is quite confusing. You’re allowed to buy and eat cannabis seeds because they’re non-psychotropic, but you can’t buy them to grow cannabis. Other countries in Europe, such as Germany, have their own seed laws.
  • In Canada, where cannabis is federally legal, seeds can be shipped across provincial lines.
  • In the U.S., in some states in which cannabis is legal, you can purchase seeds from some dispensaries or other locations to grow plants as long as you keep them in the state. Other states may bar selling to non-licensed growers. Shipping or transporting seeds across state or international borders is illegal, although a few reputable online seed stores ship to individuals with success.

Cuttings are typically treated in a similar manner as seeds in legalized locations. They may be available from some dispensaries or outlets for pick up or delivery with a fee. They’re prohibited from crossing U.S. state lines or international borders. You can buy individual plants and mix and match strains. Prices vary and are often determined by plant size.

Buy cuttings (clones) only from a reputable source who understands proper back-crossing of strains for stability. Back-crossing involves pollinating a plant with one of its parent plants to promote sexual stability, so that when you have a female it won’t hermaphrodite into a male during flowering.

Both seeds and clones are often able to be purchased from commercial locations already in your state.

In the U.S., transporting any part of the cannabis plant over state lines is illegal. This applies to seeds and clones and, technically, even to tissue samples.

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How to germinate cannabis seeds

Germinating seeds requires a dark environment that is around 70 degrees. There are many ways to germinate seeds (in soil, in a wet paper towel, in starter plugs) You can also sow them directly into soil in a garden or container, as long as the soil is light and fluffy, so the roots can easily grow down and the stalk can break through the soil. Plant the seeds about 1/4- to 1/2-inch deep and cover them loosely with soil.

Most importantly, seeds need a moist environment; they won’t germinate if they get too dry. You can use a heat mat to increase the success of germination in colder climates.

How to transplant marijuana plants

When transplanting any plant, whether it started from seed or a clone, handle it gently, being very careful not to damage the roots. Center the plant in the pot, and plant it deep enough to cover the root ball completely in soil. If the plant is root bound, you can gently tease the roots apart to encourage outward growth.

Pack your soil or other grow medium down around the roots well enough to support the plant while new roots grow, but not so tight that the soil restricts outward root growth. Water the soil around the roots.

About This Article

This article is from the book:

About the book authors:

Kim Ronkin Casey has been a communications professional for more than 20 years and recently took a year-long leap into the world of cannabis as the communications manager for one of the leading dispensaries in North America. She now consults for companies in the industry on internal and external communications. Joe Kraynak is a professional writer who has contributed to numerous For Dummies books.

Q&A: How Many Cannabis Seeds Per Pot?

How many cannabis seeds per pot? We get asked this a LOT.

It’s an understandable question with a simple answer:

It’s always one per pot.​

If you want to know why you only plant one seed per pot, then keep reading.

If not, get out there any plants some damn seeds already!

How Many Cannabis Seeds Per Pot?

It’s still just one. There are a list of things that can go wrong if you try to plant more than one. While theoretically, planting multiple plants per pot makes sense.

You can save money on planters, soil and marijuana nutrients. But, in practice, there is just too much that can go wrong.

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Multiple Seeds in One Pot

Unless your planter is HUGE, your plants are going to be fighting over nutrients and root space.

It’s not the same as planting cannabis in an in-ground garden where they can stretch their roots.

In a planter your space is already limited, and placing more than one plant in a pot can stunt both plants growth. Another problem you’ll run into is sexing.

Check out the Top Indoor Strains voted on by THCoverdose

Unless you’re buying feminized seeds from a reputable seed bank, you’re playing a game of hit or miss.

If you have a planter with two plants and one turns out to be a male you’re in a real bind. You can kill off the male, sure.

But the two plants roots might be bound to the females which will kill her too.

Exceptions to the Rule: Breeding

There is one time that putting two cannabis plants in one pot might make sense:

Breeding.

If you are low on space, you might consider putting a male clone and a female cannabis clone in the same pot.

Since you won’t have to worry about separating the plants, this could work.

You’re also not so worried about the bud you’ll get from either the male plant (which is none) or the pollinated female, so you don’t need huge plants.

This makes the fight for root space meaningless.

Click here to see the best strains to grow outside.

Let them Sprout Before you Plant

Before you’re transplanting your cannabis to their final container, you should be germinating them.

Germinating is done one seed at a time, so if you’re wanting to plant more than one seed thinking that some won’t take, don’t.

Germinated seeds with sprouted roots will sprout into the seedling stage more often than not.

If you’re not sure how to germinate, be sure to check out our guide on germinating cannabis seeds. And if the issue is money, plant your seeds in grow bags.

They are a lot more cost effective compared to clay or plastic pots.

Another cheap alternative is 5-gallon paint buckets—that have never had paint in them of course. So, unless you plan on breeding two plants, stick with just one seed per pot.

Do you know of any more situations that would require more than one cannabis seed per pot?

Also, be sure to check out this guide if you plan on growing in a greenhouse if you want to get a few tips for a better yield.